Beverly Hartline

Beverly Hartline

Vice Chancellor for Research and Dean of the Graduate School

Beverly Hartline

Beverly is Vice Chancellor for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. Among her responsibilities are supporting and increasing research and sponsored programs, managing and growing the graduate school, encouraging and supporting intellectual property and economic development, and facilitating international cooperation. She oversees the campus' undergraduate research program and helps faculty and staff find and win competitive grants. She joined Montana Tech in 2012 with over 30 years of experience in research management, science and technology policy, organization leadership in other universities and Department of Energy National Laboratories. As Assistant Director for Physical Science and Engineering at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy for 2 years, she engaged in policy issues, such as energy R&D, government accountability, scientific facilities, research funding, and increasing the participation of women and minorities in science and engineering.

Her research career started at age 6, when she wondered how plants grow. It continued through middle and high school with studies on peripheral vision, ecosystem balance, and an invasive shrimp. Her bachelor's in chemistry and physics from Reed College culminated in a thesis on organo-metallic complexes, for which she got to learn glass-blowing. Her Ph.D. is in geophysics from the University of Washington, and involved field work on the Blue Glacier, WA, an oceanographic cruise in the northeast Pacific, and placing seismometers on Mount St. Helens before it erupted, in addition to laboratory and numerical modeling research for her dissertation on thermal convection in a porous media, such as the ocean crust. She and her husband, Fred, very much enjoy Butte, Montana, and their unparalleled scenery and outdoors opportunities, including hiking, cross-country skiing, biking, and backpacking. Their two grown sons both have Ph.D.s in computer science.