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Montana   Tech   Profiles   in   Success

In September 2008, Montana Tech began working with the Montana Standard to publish success stories of our Montana Tech alumni in the Sunday edition of the newspaper. These stories tell the true tales of our alumni all over the world.

Click on the alumni's name below to view their Profiles in Success. Do you know other alumni who should be featured in future editions of MNEWS? If so, please send an email to alumni@mtech.edu.

Dan Berube
Dan Berube '71
MS Engineering Science

Dan Berube is a shining example of how a non-traditional student can help his career along by attending Montana Tech and, in his case, ultimately take the seat of one of the most traditional of posts in the state — the CEO of The Montana Power Co. 
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Tom Bandy
Tom Bandy '76
BS, Petroleum Engineering

Football was the lure, but engineering sealed the deal for Tom Bandy at Montana Tech. Coming from Havre, and wanting to play college ball, Bandy hoped to get into the University of Montana or a comparable school.

However, his father, George R. Bandy, had some influence in convincing Bandy to choose Montana Tech.   Read more




Kristy Boese
Kristy Boese '00
AS, Practical Nursing; '01 AS, Nursing; '04, BS Nursing

Nursing wasn't Kristy Boese's first choice of study. She actually was majoring in education at the University of Montana in Missoula.

"But I had twins my sophomore year in college and had to be in the hospital for several days," says the 34-year-old Deer Lodge native. " I had some really great nurses take care of me and my children. I thought, ‘Now that's a job I would enjoy." Read more




Ellen Crain
Ellen Crain '83
BS, Society and Technology

The care and concern that Montana Tech professors took to heart over their charges impressed Ellen Crain, a former nontraditional student at Tech.

"You see professors sitting with students at lunch, talking about class or just socializing," she said.

"If you missed a class, they were on you too. They'd want to know why and what you were up to," Crain said. "I never experienced that in other colleges."

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Tom Dyk
Tom Dyk '76
BS, Petroleum Engineering

Tom Dyk always knew he wanted to be an engineer, due to his fascination with the sciences. But he had no clue where a gallon of gasoline came from. That piqued his interest in petroleum engineering.

Today, not only is he well-versed in the art of finding and drilling for petroleum, but he's launching many other savvy engineers on a career path to owning their own oil and gas drilling and consulting operations. Read more






Douglas Fuerstenau
Douglas Fuerstenau '50
MS, Mineral Dressing

Douglas Fuerstenau can remember the dust bowl days of the Great Depression, growing up in South Dakota.

Because of that, he was no stranger to hard work and took jobs where he could find them.

"I might have been 12 when I worked 10 hours a day for 8 cents an hour pulling weeds for a local gardener and earned $5 a week, $20 monthly." He even had charge of shepherding some 2,000 sheep on the North Dakota prairie at the tender age of 14.

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Aaron Hieb
Aaron Hieb '00
BS, Chemistry

When you call Aaron Hieb on the phone, check the time zone. That's because he's eight hours ahead of Mountain Standard Time — in Germany.

Hieb, a 2000 graduate of Montana Tech in chemistry, is working at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) cancer research firm in Heidelberg.

Read more




Bryan Larson
Bryan Larson '97
BS, Engineering Science

Talking with Montana Tech grad Bryan Larson is like trying to keep up with a rapid-fire machine gun. He answers your questions and is on to another topic before you have time to reload.

Larson's career since Tech has jumped by leaps and bounds from one discipline to another, yet they are all tied to the disciplines he learned at the Mining City campus.

Read more




Steve Marmon
Steve Marmon '07
BS, Computer Science and BS, Software Engineering

‘Tech has great connections with companies that are loyal to Tech, such as Micron. Recruiting fairs always draw big companies.'

Living in a remote Alaskan village on the Yukon River, Steve Marmon became a jack-of-all-trades when it came to keeping computers running.

"We had three teachers in our high school and about ten for kindergarten through eighth grade," he said recently. "There was no additional staff to maintain the computer lab.

Read more




Don McBride
Don McBride '86
BS, Chemistry

When Montana Tech grad Don McBride was just starting his college career, he'd never heard of the Hanford nuclear plant in Washington.

Now he's a senior consultant for dismantling and cleanup of some plant's more dangerous and toxic sites.

"I don't think I knew how to spell Hanford when I took an internship there one summer. But they hired me back upon completion of my senior year."

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Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy '80
BS, Mining Engineering

“If you look at it for the long term, are passionate about work, work hard and never quit, the sky is the limit."

Giving out advice is always easy; accepting it is what is difficult. "It's a good thing I listened to my dad, because the decision to go to Montana Tech was one of the best I’ve made in my life," Chris Murphy said. Fortunately for Murphy, now 53, he did listen to his dad and his career and life have been greater than he could have ever imagined. As a young man, Murphy wanted to travel, perhaps lead the life of the classic ski bum at Bridger Mountain or Red Lodge or other resorts. And, he wanted to see exotic places.

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Gordon Parker
Gordon Parker '58
BS, Mining Engineering; '59 MS, Mineral Dressing

Some people have greatness thrust upon them, as the saying goes. It could well be said that happened to Gordon Parker who was told in no uncertain terms that he would be attending Montana Tech to get a mining engineering degree.

At the time, Parker was living in Tsumeb, Namibia, and had just completed an internship at Tsumeb Corp., an affiliate of Newmont Mining Corporation. The "greatness" in his career reached its zenith when he was named chairman, president and CEO of Newmont in 1985. He forestalled a hostile takeover attempt of Newmont by T. Boone Pickens and then restructured Newmont into a highly focused gold mining company.

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Dan Rovig
Dan Rovig '62
BS, Mining Engineering; '65 MS, Mineral Dressing; '08, Honorary Doctor of Science

If you are the general manager for the Berkeley Pit mining operations, you're the lightning rod for all that goes wrong with little praise for all that goes right at the copper mine.

Dan Rovig was Butte GM shortly after Salvadore Allende nationalized the Anaconda Copper Co. mines in Chile. That put a lot of pressure on Butte to produce when diesel fuel began to skyrocket and the price of copper plummeted. Rovig was just a pup, at age 36, to be running an operation with some 1,500 workers in 1975. It was a time for professional growth for Rovig, who carved out his professional career in Butte that lead to larger opportunities later on.

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Lee Saperstein
Lee Saperstein '64
BS, Mining Engineering

Environmental engineering was almost unheard of ... now it's a common thread in the curriculum, thanks to Lee Saperstein's foresight and hard work.

Lee Saperstein, 65, is learning to sail off Nantucket Island on the Atlantic Coast. It's a long way from the high and dry mountains of Butte in the summertime, but it was his college career in Butte that got him sailing toward a fascinating life as a Rhodes Scholar, a leader in the environmental engineering movement and now a deserving retiree.
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Jerry Schuyler
Jerry Schuyler '77
BS, Petroleum Engineering

Jerry Schuyler was a long-time, successful Atlantic Richfield Co. executive when something happened that convinced him to start planning his exit from the company and strike out on his own.

"It was in Karachi, Pakistan. I was the president of Arco for the region and we had just purchased a company that had a large operation in Pakistan. It was my first visit to Karachi and there was a lot of political unrest at the time. I flew into the airport late at night and it looked abandoned. All of a sudden, a Pakistani man came up to me with a sign that had my name on it, grabbed my bag, then grabbed me by the nape of the neck and said, ‘We got to move fast, let's go.' "

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